The Water Seller, Jalousie Neighborhood
       
     
  Citi Soleil: The daily tasks of mending nets and bathing.
       
     
20150112_Haiti_188.jpg
       
     
  Cite Soleil is Port-au-Prince's largest slum, in a city where 75% of the population lives in slums. The apparent calm in this photo, and neighborhood warmth that I experienced here on earlier trips, belies a volatility and simmering violence often incited by larger political players looking to get media attention.
       
     
A Five Year Window Into A World Apart: Haiti 2010 and 2015
       
     
  Christmas decorations still in the streets.
       
     
20150112_Haiti_240.jpg
       
     
  The decision not to go to school; there was unrest in the area and demonstrations against the President, so this father decided not to send his daughter to school, and to keep her close. Because of the chaotic nature of the Port-au-Prince Main Market, its often an area that rabble rousers go to first to incite riots and violence.
       
     
       
     
  BEFORE, 2 weeks after the earthquake, 2010; the Main Market edifice barely stands after the earthquake and subsequent fires.    
       
     
  AFTER: Jan, 2015. The rubble is gone and some buildings are repaired, but the life of the market is in stalls and in streets; it has never really stopped, with all its life and its chaos.    
       
     
  BEFORE, 2010, a former church interior:  The Days Given To God Are Never Really Lost.
       
     
  AFTER, 2015, commerce goes on, with the blessing of God. Most Haitians (2/3 of workforce) work in the informal economy, and 54% live on less that $1 per day.    
       
     
  BEFORE, 2010, Kids playing in an Internal Displacement Camp. 
       
     
  AFTER, 2015, Kids playing football,  as always, though now most of the parks are open and in use again. However, for some the IDP Camp experience continues; an estimated 80,000 people are still in tents.    
       
     
  BEFORE, 2010 La Piste IDP Camp house more than 8,000 families. 
       
     
  AFTER, 2015, La Piste now is returned to the open field and abandoned airstrip that it was. And see that flag pole at the end of the airstrip.....?
       
     
  AFTER, 2015...it now is where children come out to play!
       
     
20140314_Haiti_562.jpg
       
     
  The Water Seller, Jalousie Neighborhood
       
     

The Water Seller, Jalousie Neighborhood

  Citi Soleil: The daily tasks of mending nets and bathing.
       
     

Citi Soleil: The daily tasks of mending nets and bathing.

20150112_Haiti_188.jpg
       
     
  Cite Soleil is Port-au-Prince's largest slum, in a city where 75% of the population lives in slums. The apparent calm in this photo, and neighborhood warmth that I experienced here on earlier trips, belies a volatility and simmering violence often incited by larger political players looking to get media attention.
       
     

Cite Soleil is Port-au-Prince's largest slum, in a city where 75% of the population lives in slums. The apparent calm in this photo, and neighborhood warmth that I experienced here on earlier trips, belies a volatility and simmering violence often incited by larger political players looking to get media attention.

A Five Year Window Into A World Apart: Haiti 2010 and 2015
       
     
A Five Year Window Into A World Apart: Haiti 2010 and 2015

The National Cemetery on the 5th Anniversary of the Earthquake; a strange mixture of indigent, mourners, and kids hanging out playing on the tombstones. Here you find the grave of the former dictator Baby Doc Duvalier, and a mass grave hosting the remains of thousands from Jan 12, 2010. Then, there are the expected tombs of the venerable and the vulnerable from Haiti's history; many graves have been violated for the brass on the coffins, suggesting corrupted oversight, the economics of metal pricing, and the demand for human bones for the voodoo arts.

  Christmas decorations still in the streets.
       
     

Christmas decorations still in the streets.

20150112_Haiti_240.jpg
       
     
  The decision not to go to school; there was unrest in the area and demonstrations against the President, so this father decided not to send his daughter to school, and to keep her close. Because of the chaotic nature of the Port-au-Prince Main Market, its often an area that rabble rousers go to first to incite riots and violence.
       
     

The decision not to go to school; there was unrest in the area and demonstrations against the President, so this father decided not to send his daughter to school, and to keep her close. Because of the chaotic nature of the Port-au-Prince Main Market, its often an area that rabble rousers go to first to incite riots and violence.

       
     
  BEFORE, 2 weeks after the earthquake, 2010; the Main Market edifice barely stands after the earthquake and subsequent fires.    
       
     

BEFORE, 2 weeks after the earthquake, 2010; the Main Market edifice barely stands after the earthquake and subsequent fires.

 

  AFTER: Jan, 2015. The rubble is gone and some buildings are repaired, but the life of the market is in stalls and in streets; it has never really stopped, with all its life and its chaos.    
       
     

AFTER: Jan, 2015. The rubble is gone and some buildings are repaired, but the life of the market is in stalls and in streets; it has never really stopped, with all its life and its chaos.

 

  BEFORE, 2010, a former church interior:  The Days Given To God Are Never Really Lost.
       
     

BEFORE, 2010, a former church interior: The Days Given To God Are Never Really Lost.

  AFTER, 2015, commerce goes on, with the blessing of God. Most Haitians (2/3 of workforce) work in the informal economy, and 54% live on less that $1 per day.    
       
     

AFTER, 2015, commerce goes on, with the blessing of God. Most Haitians (2/3 of workforce) work in the informal economy, and 54% live on less that $1 per day.

 

  BEFORE, 2010, Kids playing in an Internal Displacement Camp. 
       
     

BEFORE, 2010, Kids playing in an Internal Displacement Camp. 

  AFTER, 2015, Kids playing football,  as always, though now most of the parks are open and in use again. However, for some the IDP Camp experience continues; an estimated 80,000 people are still in tents.    
       
     

AFTER, 2015, Kids playing football,  as always, though now most of the parks are open and in use again. However, for some the IDP Camp experience continues; an estimated 80,000 people are still in tents.

 

  BEFORE, 2010 La Piste IDP Camp house more than 8,000 families. 
       
     

BEFORE, 2010 La Piste IDP Camp house more than 8,000 families. 

  AFTER, 2015, La Piste now is returned to the open field and abandoned airstrip that it was. And see that flag pole at the end of the airstrip.....?
       
     

AFTER, 2015, La Piste now is returned to the open field and abandoned airstrip that it was. And see that flag pole at the end of the airstrip.....?

  AFTER, 2015...it now is where children come out to play!
       
     

AFTER, 2015...it now is where children come out to play!

20140314_Haiti_562.jpg